'Bangladesh is divided along cultural fault lines', Professor Mohammad Azam discusses at Gyantaposh Abdur Razzak Foundation

The culture and traditions of the country have been colonised. Thoughts which originate in Kolkata are being accepted in Dhaka’s society without due consideration. 

Books to read about the oppression of women in Iran

To understand the socio-political context and the country’s present state of affairs—one which gave birth to such daring dissenters—it is important to read books and stories which unveil the experience of individuals chained by Iran’s despots. 

‘Nil Chhaya’ reconjures ghosts of Bengal’s Indigo Revolution

‘Nil Chhaya' connects the Indigo Revolt to the oppressions faced by present day garment factory workers in Bangladesh.

Of diverse princesses and demigods: Is racebending in fantasy adaptations enough?

Progress is underway, but some studios are still hiding behind the curtain of racebending as if it will solve all of the problems of race innate to cinema itself. Nonetheless, all of it matters—Ariel and Annabeth being portrayed by young Black women—because what we read and watch feeds our imagination.

Race and unease in Mohsin Hamid’s ‘The Last White Man’

In The Last White Man, Hamid uses an anodyne, clinical voice to set an atmosphere of unease of a white society panicking within, as a wave of darkness intrudes their skin, turning them impure, perhaps wild.

6d ago| Theatre & Arts

Ginsberg, Dylan, Bhowmik’s anti-war pleas still relevant today

Fifty-one years ago, in this very month of September, Allen Ginsberg visited the Jessore Road. Upon his return to America, he would write the anti-war poem “September on Jessore Road”, which would be monumental in shifting the opinions of Americans to oppose the support of Pakistan in the Liberation War.

A new reader’s guide to Agatha Christie’s world of crime

Published in 1920, this was Christie’s debut novel that introduced readers to her unconventional detective, Poirot.

SHOUTxDS Books presents ‘Slam Poetry Nights’ — Episode 1

The poems ranged from mental health issues to individual freedom of expression and every musing in between.

Akbar Ali Khan: the “Learned” and self-critical scholar

He intended to break down the jargon of economics, history, politics, and the theories behind it and make them palatable to the everyday readers. He inspired people to take part in shaping the tools and mechanisms that drive the governance of the state.

'Infinite Library': An immersive experience of civilisation at Goethe Dhaka

The Infinite Library did not have books. It consisted of virtual spaces, a set of "eight jars" or volumes that—using a VR journey through the users' phones—told the story of our planet's evolution, starting from the beginning of cosmic dust to human consciousness.

‘Sisters In The Mirror’ deconstructs the concept of "oppressed Muslim women"

"While the book is based on academic research, I've tried to write it for the 'interested educated reader'".

Anyone can be a hero: Why I love ‘Percy Jackson & The Olympians’

From mental health struggles to characters with different racial and LGBTQ+ backgrounds, the series shines a light on people—and heroes—of diverse identities.

September 8, 2022
September 8, 2022

First Slam Poetry Night event organised by SHOUT and DS Books

SHOUT and DS Books put on their first Slam Poetry Night.

September 8, 2022
September 8, 2022

In the aftermath of the Palestinian catastrophe—'Minor Detail' by Adania Shibli (trans. Elisabeth Jaquette)

This book is an essential read to understand the extent of the erasure of Palestinian history after the Nakba and life under tyranny in its cities.

September 8, 2022
September 8, 2022

A deep dive into a poet’s mind

He had lost touch almost completely with his craft, so much so that he wondered if he even had it in him. But even so, for the sake of writing, he wrote. When the pandemic hit, Helal batted off the dust of his desk and sat down to write. Sitting from a foreign land, the ink flowed again.

September 8, 2022
September 8, 2022

Within the narrative folds of ‘Amar Dekha Rajnitir Ponchash Bochhor’ by Abul Mansur Ahmad

Amar Dekha Rajnitir Ponchash Bochhor unfolds a very complex process of how the people create cultures, how cultures create political orders, how orders lead to the formation of political parties, how these parties engage with political activities, and how this in turn shapes the central powers in a state.

September 7, 2022
September 7, 2022

South Asia Speaks creative writing mentorship open for applications

The free, year-long fellowship for creative writers from South Asia, is accepting applications until September 30, 2022. 

September 5, 2022
September 5, 2022

Commonwealth Short Story Prize 2023 open for submissions

Free to enter and open to any citizen, aged 18 and over, of a Commonwealth country, the prize accepts short story entries written in English and translated to English, as well as stories written in Bangla, Chinese, French, Greek, Kiswahili, Malay, Portuguese, Samoan, Tamil and Turkish languages. 

September 5, 2022
September 5, 2022

‘I enjoy being alone’: Helal Hafiz

Helal Hafiz has been suffering from glaucoma for a long time, alongside complications with his kidney, diabetes and nerve complications.

September 4, 2022
September 4, 2022

‘The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power’—One series to fail them all?

What point is Lord of the Rings making in 2022? That people are racist and wage wars? The original trilogy, from two decades ago, was making that same point.

September 2, 2022
September 2, 2022

Why ‘Hawa’ reminded me of Coleridge’s ‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’

The song “Shada Shada Kala Kala” seems almost like a visual rendition of “the merry minstrelsy” that breaks out in front of the bride as red as a rose.

September 1, 2022
September 1, 2022

No country for honest men in Shahidul Zahir’s “Woodcutter and Crows”

Zahir uses crows as a symbol of magic realism, as found in local folklore, where animals serve as omens of luck both good and bad. The crows seem to bring bad luck to the couple, and wherever they go, the birds follow.