Project Syndicate | The Daily Star
  • Journalism's Comeback

    After years of ill health, the news industry is finally showing signs of a modest recovery. According to the Digital News Report 2018—the most comprehensive survey of digital media consumption—subscriptions are trending up while consumer confidence has stabilised.

  • Trump's assault on refugees

    The decision by US President Donald Trump's administration to stop funding the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) has politicised humanitarian aid, threatens to add yet more fuel to one of the world's most combustible conflicts, and jeopardises the futures of a half-million Palestinian children and young people.

  • India should accept disaster assistance

    India's southern state of Kerala has been hit by the worst floods in nearly a century. Now that the floodwaters are receding, a peculiar debate has emerged over whether India should accept foreign aid to support reconstruction.

  • Europe's populist fifth column

    European security currently rests essentially on the Nato alliance and the principle of mutual defence, and on cooperation between national intelligence services working to prevent violence against people and national assets.

  • Sustaining Europe's security trio

    Despite the tensions generated by Brexit, the leaders of France, Germany, and the United Kingdom have stood together in disputes between the European Union and the United States. If their unity can be sustained, Europe's “big three” (E3) will serve the EU very well in a tumultuous future.

  • The myth of 'secular stagnation'

    In the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, some economists argued that the United States, and perhaps the global economy, was suffering from “secular stagnation,”

  • Navigating the Syrian endgame

    After a suspiciously sudden conversion, Russian President Vladimir Putin now claims to be worried about the fate of millions of refugees who have fled the carnage in Syria.

  • Confronting journalism's misogynistic trolls

    Before the Internet revolution-ised how news was gathered and shared, journalists rarely had to worry about the threat of virtual violence.

  • Globalisation with Chinese characteristics

    US President Donald Trump's erratic unilateralism represents nothing less than abdication of global economic and political leadership.

  • Prevention is the best migration cure

    With newspapers full of stories about the challenges migrant families face, it might be tempting to assume that the causes of displacement are also being addressed.

  • The US is at risk of losing a trade war with China

    What was at first a trade skirmish—with US President Donald Trump imposing tariffs on steel and aluminum—appears to be quickly morphing into a full-scale trade war with China.

  • The two best ways to reduce infant mortality

    One of the more ambitious targets of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is the commitment to end preventable deaths of newborns and children over the next decade. If this target is met, by 2030 no country will have a neonatal mortality rate above 12 deaths per 1,000 births—a quarter of the current rate in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa.

  • The BRICS in a multipolar world

    This week, South Africa is hosting the tenth annual gathering of the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa). When the first BRIC summit was held in 2009 (South Africa was added in 2010), the world was in the throes of a financial crisis of the developed world's making, and the increasingly dynamic BRIC bloc represented the future.

  • The End of NATO?

    What is left of NATO and the transatlantic order after US President Donald Trump's tumultuous week in Brussels, the United Kingdom, and Helsinki, where he defended Russian President Vladimir Putin against accusations of cyber warfare by America's own intelligence agencies?

  • How can we retain the benefits of globalisation?

    In the last few years, for many people and their leaders, globalisation has become a scourge to be purged in favour of greater protectionism and unilateralism.

  • Smart immigration for Europe

    Immigration-related headlines have become a staple in Europe, whether the story is of an illegal Malian immigrant scaling a Paris building to rescue a toddler or the formation of a populist government in Italy that aims to deport a half-million migrants.

  • The Decline and Fall of Brexit

    In the beginning, British Prime Minister Theresa May had a plan: “Brexit means Brexit.” The idea was to withdraw the United Kingdom from the European Union so fast that voters would not realise they had been sold a bill of goods during the EU referendum campaign and should therefore not punish the Conservative Party for having lied to them.

  • Why governments should invest in sports

    As the World Cup unfolds, captivating soccer fans around the globe, the broad appeal of high-level sports is on full display.

  • The World Cup of Press Freedom

    President Vladimir Putin worked hard to bring the 2018 FIFA World Cup to Russia, but now that the spectacle is underway, his influence has waned.

  • Europe's left turns right on immigration

    Europe's established left is facing the threat of extinction. In less than two years, the continent's social-democratic parties have suffered historic losses in France, the Netherlands, Germany, and Italy. On a continent long defined by democratic competition between centre-right and centre-left parties, the collapse of the left could have far-reaching consequences, beyond particular party interests.

  • A verifiable path to nuclear disarmament

    As officials from the United States and North Korea prepare for the June 12 summit meeting between Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un, nuclear experts must come to terms with a significant question: If Kim commits to dismantling his nuclear stockpile, how can the world be sure that he is following through?

  • Education Saved My Life

    My family was murdered before I could tie my shoes. As a young boy in Sierra Leone, years that should have been playful and carefree were spent fighting in someone else's war.

  • An assault on India's institutions

    In India's Karnataka state, the governor is favouring the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) to form a government, despite an opposition coalition having won more seats in the state legislature.

  • Why we need globalisation

    From the Brexit vote to Donald Trump's election as US president to rising support for populist parties in countries like Germany and Italy, much of the electoral upheaval in Western democracies in recent years has been attributed at least partly to a backlash against globalisation. But globalisation does not deserve voters' ire.

  • Facing Facebook's Responsibility

    When Facebook went public in May 2012, its capacity for effective corporate governance was already in doubt. Fast-forward six years, and Facebook has accumulated massive power, access, and influence—and, in many ways, proved the doubters right.

  • Empowering Bangladesh's female garment workers

    FOR four decades, the garment industry has powered Bangladesh's economy and put more people to work than any other sector. Women in particular have benefited from this hiring boom, and today, a majority of the industry's four million employees are female.

  • How Europe can save the Iran nuclear deal

    This week, a senior German official pointed out to me that, “The Iran nuclear deal is the last firewall preventing military tensions in the world's most combustible region from spilling over into thermonuclear war.” That language is unusually apocalyptic, but it reflects a genuine fear that US President Donald Trump could soon dismantle a crucial line of defence that Germans and other Europeans are proud to have built.

  • Why is Bangladesh booming?

    Bangladesh has become one of Asia's most remarkable and unexpected success stories in recent years. Once one of the poorest regions of Pakistan, Bangladesh remained an economic basket case—wracked by poverty and famine—for many years after independence in 1971. In fact, by 2006, conditions seemed so hopeless that when Bangladesh registered faster growth than Pakistan, it was dismissed as a fluke.

  • The West's Crisis of Confidence

    In an age defined by US President Donald Trump's rage, Russian President Vladimir Putin's revisionism, and Chinese President Xi Jinping's unbridled ambition, the international order is becoming increasingly disorderly, dysfunctional, and even dangerous. How did we arrive at this state of affairs? And how can we leave it behind?

  • Fifty Shades of Trump

    Last week was a most unusual one for President Donald Trump's administration. There was no high-level firing: the only dismissal of any note was that of the White House aide in charge of homeland security, who was forced out at the behest of John Bolton, who had just taken over as Trump's third national security adviser in 15 months. Nonetheless, it may well have been the most turbulent week yet of Trump's presidency.

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