Lifestyle

Ray of hope for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers

In the past, gastrointestinal cancers such as colorectal cancer and stomach cancer were usually treated with surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy, but the advent of targeted therapies has had a significant effect of prolonging life for patients with these diseases.

Revolutionising colon cancer treatment

Colorectal cancer or colon cancer, which occurs in the colon or rectum, is the third most common cancer behind only lung and prostate cancers in men and lung and breast cancers in women, and the second leading cause of cancer death.

Latest in knee surgery

Pinu Haq has led a healthy, productive life. Having retired ten years ago as a communications consultant, she now leads a simpler life, spending time with family and her grandchildren.

New Year’s Finger Food

New Year's Eve is here and those of us who are planning to have a bash at home are all planning menus. Sometimes we forget about the scrumptious finger food we can serve instead of just chips and dip. I'm planning to put things on sticks, shooter glasses and soup spoons this year!

July 30, 2019
July 30, 2019

Ray of hope for the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers

In the past, gastrointestinal cancers such as colorectal cancer and stomach cancer were usually treated with surgery, radiation and/or chemotherapy, but the advent of targeted therapies has had a significant effect of prolonging life for patients with these diseases.

August 11, 2015
August 11, 2015

Revolutionising colon cancer treatment

Colorectal cancer or colon cancer, which occurs in the colon or rectum, is the third most common cancer behind only lung and prostate cancers in men and lung and breast cancers in women, and the second leading cause of cancer death.

August 4, 2015
August 4, 2015

Latest in knee surgery

Pinu Haq has led a healthy, productive life. Having retired ten years ago as a communications consultant, she now leads a simpler life, spending time with family and her grandchildren.

February 27, 2015
February 27, 2015

Cut music to ‘an hour a day’: WHO

People should listen to music for no more than one hour a day to protect their hearing, the WHO suggests.

February 24, 2015
February 24, 2015

Go nuts!

A nut is a fruit composed of a hard shell and a seed and is generally edible. Nuts have different nutritional values and offer health benefits as well as help in losing weight.

February 17, 2015
February 17, 2015

Hale and hearty

One of the most overused clichés you have probably heard is, “Health is wealth”. It has been used so much that the importance of it has probably been lost. We do not pay heed to our health.

February 12, 2015
February 12, 2015

24/7 help at hand for women

ASSUMPTIONS. When it comes to technology, we assume a lot of things. We assume that with education and access to technology, anyone and everyone should be able to access information.

February 1, 2015
February 1, 2015

Now heart failure patients can also lead a normal life!

With the increasing number of cardiovascular patients, the number of heart failure is increasing. The HVAD® System allows heart failure programmes to treat a broad range of patients, improve patient survival and patient quality of life. This makes the HVAD System the choice for heart failure programmes around the world.

February 1, 2015
February 1, 2015

Managing mobile thumbs

Complications in the thumbs are growing and an alarming issue among texters, gamers and computer users. For every pound of pressure that you push at the tip of your thumb, it is magnified at the base of your thumb. It is estimated that people run a high risk of texting injuries if they text over 80 messages a day. This is about the equivalent of spending one hour a day only texting — repeatedly and rapidly tapping the thumb on a key pad daily makes sustained pressure at the tip of the thumb being magnified at the thumb’s base! Over time, repeated thumb use or injury can lead to problems.

February 1, 2015
February 1, 2015

Exercise advice unrealistic!

Researchers says in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) that current exercise guidelines are unrealistic and argue that doctors should sometimes advise small increases in activity instead.