MM Shahidul Hassan

How should our engineering education evolve?

Over the years, engineering programmes in Bangladeshi universities have stagnated, still clinging to a 20th-century structure.

2w ago

Our outdated, inefficient higher education institutions

The world has never witnessed such unprecedented human-to-technology interactions.

The role of Bangladeshi universities in the era of AI

How many jobs will disappear in a country depends on the industry, type of work, and pace of AI development.

Accreditation: A proven method to get programme recognition

At the time of Bangladesh’s liberation, there existed only six public universities, and the total number of students was around 25,000.

Impact of the fourth industrial revolution on classroom education

Bangladesh cannot ignore the changes brought about by the fourth industrial revolution.

Keeping up with the Fourth Industrial Revolution a crucial factor in economic growth

Over the past decade, there has been tremendous interest in understanding how technology is shaping the nature of work and education around the world.

Why knowledge-based economies are richer

It is inarguable that education is important, as it opens the door to a better life for everyone.

Research universities can light the way for tomorrow’s Bangladesh

Higher education is rapidly expanding in developing countries. There were only four public universities at the time of Bangladesh’s inception as a sovereign country in 1971. The country has now a total of 43 public and 103 private universities. The number of students enrolled in universities has shot up from 4,11,717 in 2008 to10,28,314 in 2018 (BANBEIS). But what does it mean for economic development?

February 12, 2024
February 12, 2024

How should our engineering education evolve?

Over the years, engineering programmes in Bangladeshi universities have stagnated, still clinging to a 20th-century structure.

December 19, 2023
December 19, 2023

Our outdated, inefficient higher education institutions

The world has never witnessed such unprecedented human-to-technology interactions.

September 24, 2023
September 24, 2023

The role of Bangladeshi universities in the era of AI

How many jobs will disappear in a country depends on the industry, type of work, and pace of AI development.

May 28, 2023
May 28, 2023

Accreditation: A proven method to get programme recognition

At the time of Bangladesh’s liberation, there existed only six public universities, and the total number of students was around 25,000.

August 14, 2022
August 14, 2022

Impact of the fourth industrial revolution on classroom education

Bangladesh cannot ignore the changes brought about by the fourth industrial revolution.

December 12, 2021
December 12, 2021

Keeping up with the Fourth Industrial Revolution a crucial factor in economic growth

Over the past decade, there has been tremendous interest in understanding how technology is shaping the nature of work and education around the world.

November 19, 2019
November 19, 2019

Why knowledge-based economies are richer

It is inarguable that education is important, as it opens the door to a better life for everyone.

July 3, 2019
July 3, 2019

Research universities can light the way for tomorrow’s Bangladesh

Higher education is rapidly expanding in developing countries. There were only four public universities at the time of Bangladesh’s inception as a sovereign country in 1971. The country has now a total of 43 public and 103 private universities. The number of students enrolled in universities has shot up from 4,11,717 in 2008 to10,28,314 in 2018 (BANBEIS). But what does it mean for economic development?

June 11, 2019
June 11, 2019

How universities can improve student satisfaction and quality of learning

Societies in both developed and developing countries are increasingly aware of the vital role that university graduates can play to advance their economies. Many examples can be cited where graduates helped to pull their countries out of recession (David Willetts 2017).

March 1, 2019
March 1, 2019

Creating a generation of learners and innovators

The curriculum for any undergraduate programme is highly influenced by the social, physical, economic and cultural environment. Consequently, with the change of any such setting(s), its development process will also change. The great economist and Nobel Laureate, Wassily Leontief, wrote in 1953 that “labour will become less and less important… More and more workers will be replaced by machines.”

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