Firefighters starting to lose hope | The Daily Star
12:00 AM, September 23, 2019 / LAST MODIFIED: 12:50 AM, September 23, 2019

Firefighters starting to lose hope

Burned area doubles in Bolivia’s Amazon region

Bolivian volunteer firefighters, exhausted from battling blazes sweeping rapidly across the country’s lowlands, are starting to lose hope and retreat from the front lines of some infernos in the drought-stricken region.

The fires this year are Bolivia’s worst in at least two decades, with the size of burned land across the country nearly doubling in under three weeks, destroying swaths of biodiverse forest and ranches and farms that sustain thousands of people.

In the dusty cattle ranching town of Concepcion, despite nearly two months of non-stop firefighting, blazes that had been put out in surrounding dry forests have reignited while others continue to spread toward the Noel Kempff Mercado National Park, a gateway to pristine Amazonian rainforest.

“Nothing has been controlled. The fires continue,” said Elias Johns, the deputy governor of the province of Nuflo Chavez, where Concepcion is located.

While helicopters have doused flames around Concepcion, the Boeing supertanker 747 that Bolivian President Evo Morales ordered to battle blazes across the country has not yet made it here. The heat and smoke are so intense along part of the front lines that firefighters cannot remain working for more than several minutes at a time.

Local firefighters with Bolivia’s volunteer-based force say they are poorly equipped with little more than backpacks of water, hoses and machetes, lacking heavy machinery to clear debris and stop fires from advancing.

Some 700 to 800 volunteer firefighters have gone home, Johns said. The province now mostly relies on foreign units from Argentina and France and Bolivian soldiers sent to help.

With no sign of the fires slowing, residents are anxiously waiting for the start of the rainy season, which might not come until October.

Wildfires in Bolivia this year have spread over 4.1 million hectares (16,000 square miles) through Sept 15, up from 2.1 million hectares less than three weeks earlier, according to the Bolivian environmental group Fundacion Amigos de la Naturaleza.

 

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