• Saturday, July 26, 2014

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Scientists

Darwin was right...dogs really do get jealous

Darwin was right...dogs really do get jealous

In The Descent of Man, Charles Darwin noted that ‘everyone has seen how jealous a dog is of his master’s affection, if lavished on any other creature.’ But since the evolutionary biologist made the observation in 1871, scientists have debated whether animals can actually feel jealousy, with many arguing it is an emotion that...

Bats might not be as blind as previously thought

Bats might not be as blind as previously thought

Scientists have discovered that bats use polarization of the setting sun to orient their internal magnetic compasses before setting out to hunt in the dark. According to the new study, published in the journal Nature Communications, birds are known to use the pattern of polarized light in the sky to help them calibrate their...

Blood test could give early breast cancer warning

Blood test could give early breast cancer warning

A simple blood test could offer many women an early warning of breast cancer even if they do not inherit genes linked to the disease. Scientists have identified a molecular "switch" in blood samples that increases a woman's chances of having breast cancer. The marker is associated with the BRCA1 breast cancer gene, but...

Gestures can be made readable

Gestures can be made readable

For years scientists have worked to find a way to make it easier for deaf and hearing impaired people to communicate. And now it is hoped that a new intelligent system could be about to transform their lives. Researchers have used image recognition to translate sign language into 'readable language' and while it is...

First case of Bangladeshi MERS victim detected

Scientists have identified an expatriate to be the first Bangladeshi ever diagnosed with MERS coronavirus in the country. The 53-year-old arrived in Dhaka from New York via Abu Dhabi two weeks ago, said Moshtak Hossain, principal scientific officer of the Institute of Epidemiology, Disease Control & Research (IEDCR) in the capital. The patient was admitted to a city hospital with fever, cough and respiratory difficulties on June 9. On information, researchers collected and tested the blood samples at the IEDCR and...

Red meat possibly linked to breast cancer: Study

Red meat possibly linked to breast cancer: Study

Women who often indulge their cravings for hamburgers, steaks and other red meat may have a slightly higher risk of breast cancer, a new study suggests. Doctors have long warned that a diet loaded with red meat is linked to cancers including those of the colon and pancreas, but there has been less evidence...

Anaesthesia during infancy can affect memory: Study

Anaesthesia during infancy can affect memory: Study

General anaesthesia before the age of one may impair memory later in childhood, possibly life-long, a study said today. This was the conclusion of scientists who compared the recollection skills of two groups of children-- some who had undergone anaesthesia in infancy and others who had not, reports The Indian Express. The children, aged six...

Antarctic Glacier

Ice collapse goes unstoppable

Ice collapse goes unstoppable

The huge West Antarctic ice sheet is starting a glacially slow collapse in an unstoppable way, two new studies show. Alarmed scientists say that means even more sea level rise than they figured. The worrisome outcomes won't be seen soon. Scientists are talking hundreds of years, but over that time the melt that has started...

Unesco warns Australia over Great Barrier Reef

Unesco warns Australia over Great Barrier Reef

Unesco has threatened to list the Great Barrier Reef as a World Heritage in Danger site, amid controversy over a plan to dump dredged sediment. Reef authorities granted permission for the dumping in January as part of a project to create one of the world's biggest coal ports. But scientists have warned that the sediment...

'Jesus's Wife' papyrus fragment not a forgery: Scientists

'Jesus's Wife' papyrus fragment not a forgery: Scientists

Scientists who examined a controversial fragment of papyrus written in Egyptian Coptic in which Jesus speaks of his wife concluded in papers published on Thursday that the papyrus and ink are probably ancient and not a modern forgery. The existence of the fragment, known as the "Gospel of Jesus's Wife," was made public at...

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