• Wednesday, November 26, 2014

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Scientists

Mind reading possible?

Mind reading possible?

It might seem the stuff of science fiction, but a mind-reading device is being developed by scientists which can evesdrop on your inner-voice. Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a machine and computer programme which converts brain activity into sounds and words. Speech activates specific neurons as the brain works interpret...

All that glitters is not 23-karat gold

All that glitters is not 23-karat gold

Scientists, examining Britain's greatest Anglo-Saxon gold treasure collection, have discovered that it isn't quite as golden as they thought. Tests on the famous Staffordshire Anglo-Saxon treasure, a vast gold and silver hoard found by a metal detectorist five years ago, have now revealed that the 7th century Anglo-Saxon goldsmiths used sophisticated techniques to make...

Plants 'absorb more CO2 than thought'

Plants 'absorb more CO2 than thought'

Global climate models have underestimated the amount of CO2 being absorbed by plants, according to new research. Scientists say that between 1901 and 2010, living things absorbed 16 percent more of the gas than previously thought. The authors say it explains why models consistently overestimated the growth rate of carbon in the atmosphere. But experts believe...

Cave paintings change ideas about the origin of art

Cave paintings change ideas about the origin of art

Scientists have identified some of the earliest cave paintings produced by humans. The artworks are in a rural area on the Indonesian Island of Sulawesi. Until now, paintings this old had been confirmed in caves only in Western Europe. Researchers tell the journal Nature that the Indonesian discovery transforms ideas about how humans first developed the...

Polar ice shrinking rapidly

Polar ice shrinking rapidly

The planet's two largest ice sheets -- in Greenland and Antarctica -- are now being depleted at an astonishing rate of 120 cubic miles each year. That is the discovery made by scientists using data from CryoSat-2, the European probe that has been measuring the thickness of Earth's ice sheets and glaciers since...

Magpies 'don't steal shiny objects'

Magpies 'don't steal shiny objects'

Magpies do not steal trinkets and are positively scared of shiny objects, according to new research. The study appears to redeem the myth of the “thieving magpie”, which pervades European folklore. It is widely believed that magpies have a compulsive urge to steal sparkly things for their nests. But Exeter University scientists show that the birds...

Insight

Grape farming in Bangladesh on the rise

Grape farming in Bangladesh on the rise

Bangladeshi farmers have been trying to cultivate grapes for a long time beside other high value crops. Many have tried their best and came really closer to success and very few have actually gotten hold of it. Scientists have also kept on working hard to mitigate difficulties. Sporadic commercial farming went on as...

Darwin was right...dogs really do get jealous

Darwin was right...dogs really do get jealous

In The Descent of Man, Charles Darwin noted that ‘everyone has seen how jealous a dog is of his master’s affection, if lavished on any other creature.’ But since the evolutionary biologist made the observation in 1871, scientists have debated whether animals can actually feel jealousy, with many arguing it is an emotion that...

Bats might not be as blind as previously thought

Bats might not be as blind as previously thought

Scientists have discovered that bats use polarization of the setting sun to orient their internal magnetic compasses before setting out to hunt in the dark. According to the new study, published in the journal Nature Communications, birds are known to use the pattern of polarized light in the sky to help them calibrate their...

Blood test could give early breast cancer warning

Blood test could give early breast cancer warning

A simple blood test could offer many women an early warning of breast cancer even if they do not inherit genes linked to the disease. Scientists have identified a molecular "switch" in blood samples that increases a woman's chances of having breast cancer. The marker is associated with the BRCA1 breast cancer gene, but...

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