Madrasa must use approved books | The Daily Star
12:00 AM, June 03, 2009 / LAST MODIFIED: 12:00 AM, June 03, 2009

Madrasa must use approved books

JS body recommends banning Moududi, other books

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The Parliamentary Standing Committee on Education yesterday made strong recommendations for imposing a ban on use of 'unapproved books' in madrasas, including those written by controversial writer also founder of Jamaat-e-Islami, Syed Abul Ala Moududi.
The committee recommended that all madrasas should follow books that are approved by the madrasa board.
Chairman of the committee, Rashed Khan Menon, told The Daily Star after a committee meeting in the parliament building that his committee recommended to the government to introduce creative education methods in all public examinations in phases.
"We have recommended to the government that madrasas should follow only the books that are approved by the madrasa board, and no other," he said.
"We have also recommended that the government bans in madrasas, books written by Syed Abul Ala Moududi," a ruling coalition lawmaker Menon, also president of the Workers Party of Bangladesh, added.
The parliamentary committee also recommended that all madrasas must hang portraits of the Father of the Nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in their offices.
It also recommended for madrasas to ensure that the national anthem is sung on the campuses everyday.
"We have asked the madrasa authorities to observe different national days including Independence Day and Victory Day at all madrasas with due respect," Menon said.
Different quarters allege that Moududi misinterpreted Islam in his books and spread Islamist radicalism in the sub-continent.
Ahmadiyya Muslim Jamaat claim that Moududi first launched the anti-Ahmadiyya campaign in 1934. After the partition of the erstwhile undivided India, he settled in Pakistan and started spreading religious hatred with rejuvenated zeal.
Bangladesh Parliament on June 28, 2004 witnessed a 15-minute debate over Syed Abul Ala Moududi when the erstwhile main opposition Awami League (AL) threatened to walk out of a session.
Jamaat Amir Motiur Rahman Nizami sparked the debate raising the issue during his budget speech.
Nizami, also the then industries minister, lambasted AL for accusing Moududi of igniting violence in 1953 in the erstwhile united Pakistan, and defended the ideology of Moududi, who founded Jamaat in 1942.

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