Historical

Building regulating office: The need of the times

Abuilding is an infrastructure built permanently or semi-permanently for the use of various characters of occupancies in safe, comfortable and good environmental condition. For sustainable development of building infrastructures various acts, rules, regulations and guidelines are made for strict compliance in addition to setting codes for its safe construction and maintenance practices. In 1993 Bangladesh National Building Code (BNBC) had been published for bringing unanimity in planning, designing, construction, maintenance and even in demolishing practices in the country considering its socio-economic, cultural, religious and environmental conditions. The code was supposed to be followed by all concerned as a good practice. Unfortunately, irregularities in every aspect of building...

Lack of authority makes building code ineffective


Rangs building being demolished yielding space to a link road. Inset- Figure 01: Partners and stake holders in building development.Photo: Anisur Rahman

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So little for so many

Today's piece is the second and concluding part of a report filed by Centre for Urban Studies and WaterAid in Bangladesh on public toilets in Dhaka city.
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Low cost housing for the urban poor in Dhaka City: <i>Studio design </i>

Background: In March 2009, Centre for Urban Studies arranged a studio design workshop for low income group in Dhaka by the students of Department of Architecture, University of Asia Pacific (UAP), Bangladesh with support from URBIS Capacity Building Support for NDBUS (Nagar Daridra Basteebashir Unnayan Sangstha), a registered organisation with social welfare department, Dhaka representing urban poor and slum dwellers of Dhaka city.
About the Course: The workshop is an outcome of an eight-week long academic programme covered by the 4th year UAP architecture students as a design workshop. The students conducted physical and socio-economic surveys on three sites within DCC jurisdiction and prepared design proposals for site- specific upgrading and rehabilitation...

April 3, 2010
April 3, 2010
April 3, 2010
November 13, 2009
November 13, 2009
July 24, 2009
July 24, 2009

Students can kick the 'im' from the 'impossible'

STUDENT projects are always exciting and invigorating. Impractical as they are supposed to be studio exercises invokes intelligent discussions and gives light to a new, fresh path. That in many ways is the way forward.
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July 24, 2009
July 24, 2009

Low cost housing for the urban poor in Dhaka City: <i>Studio design </i>

Background: In March 2009, Centre for Urban Studies arranged a studio design workshop for low income group in Dhaka by the students of Department of Architecture, University of Asia Pacific (UAP), Bangladesh with support from URBIS Capacity Building Support for NDBUS (Nagar Daridra Basteebashir Unnayan Sangstha), a registered organisation with social welfare department, Dhaka representing urban poor and slum dwellers of Dhaka city.
About the Course: The workshop is an outcome of an eight-week long academic programme covered by the 4th year UAP architecture students as a design workshop. The students conducted physical and socio-economic surveys on three sites within DCC jurisdiction and prepared design proposals for site- specific upgrading and rehabilitation...

July 10, 2009
July 10, 2009

Machine and material at the cost of man

OUR human workforce is the mainstay of our economy. Many of them are illiterate, but are often the only rice earner for their family. Yet, their life in the working environment, supposed to be made safe by their employee for compliance with national and international legal bindings, is fraught with dangers. One of the elements that constantly threaten them, to which they are largely unaware, is fire.
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July 10, 2009
July 10, 2009
June 26, 2009
June 26, 2009

Housing delayed is housing denied

While Dhaka hits the global headlines as one of the fastest growing cities in the world by population, unplanned development, enhanced by land encroachment and flouting of legal requirements, irresponsible approach to professional obligations by all and sundry, and display of the 'thumb' by the greedy and corrupt, has led the housing situation to an ever-shifting brink where today more than a third of the urban population four decades into our independence live in dire conditions, unimaginable for many.
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