Travel | The Daily Star
  • Nat Geo's exclusive with emerging explorer Wasfia Nazreen

    Wasfia Nazreen, who was recently awarded as the Emerging Explorer accolade by National Geographic gives an exclusive interview about how it all began.

  • Inside the lost cave world of the Amazons

    The secret world hidden within the rocky Tapuis mountains are no longer a mystery.

  • National harbour waterfront

    The last words of poet Francois Rabelais were, “I go to see a Great Perhaps.”

  • Seasons Under the Sun

    You don't know freedom until you've been repeatedly refused a trip to Cox's Bazar with your friends and then have been allowed a trip to Italy completely unsupervised, all by yourself.

  • One of the world’s most dangerous roads

    If driving in Dhaka frustrates you, have a look at one of the most dangerous roads in the world, in Jammu, Khasmir where you two motorbikes are slowly trying to ascend a mountain.

  • Tourism sector gears up to reduce carbon footprint

    It is not until the recent years that some hotels began hanging the “reuse your towel, save a penguin” signs on the towel racks. While cynics might dismiss this approach as greenwashing, few major players are engaged in a streamlined operation to reduce carbon emissions.

  • Radiant Rangoon

    The curious appeal of Rangoon, as late, is its stark contradictions. They are manifested almost in everywhere. The winds of change by opening up to the world has resulted in import of newest model Japanese cars , growing number of swanky hotels, Latin and European football mania , fast-food joints to almost anything trendy across the globe.

  • Mawlamyine’s “damaged eye”-4

    The Soe Brothers Guesthouse jointly organises a roundtrip with the Breeze guesthouse in Mawlamyine.

  • [WATCH NOW] Journey to the source of Matamuhuri river

    Of the hundreds of rivers in Bangladesh, only two rivers -- Sangu and Matamuhuri -- have originated from Bangladesh. Both rivers are located in the southeastern hilly part of Bangladesh.

  • Myanmar’s mesmerising southeast -3

    If you haven’t taken the train in Myanmar, you haven’t actually been there. Despite the myriad complaints for being slow, incompetent, late, poor in service quality and unpredictable bumpy rides, it’s the trains that speak of a uniquely diverse nation, unwraps a country blessed by Mother Nature while enabling one to feel its pulse.

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