Starmer new UK Labour leader | The Daily Star
12:00 AM, April 05, 2020 / LAST MODIFIED: 12:00 AM, April 05, 2020

Starmer new UK Labour leader

Pro-European centrist Keir Starmer was unveiled as new Labour party leader yesterday, heralding a shift in Britain's main opposition party after a crushing election defeat under veteran socialist Jeremy Corbyn and years of ideological infighting.

The 57-year-old former chief state prosecutor defeated Corbyn loyalist Rebecca Long-Bailey and backbencher Lisa Nandy in a lengthy campaign sparked by Corbyn's resignation after December's loss at the polls to Boris Johnson's Conservatives.

Angela Rayner becomes the new deputy leader, Labour announced on Twitter, after it was forced to cancel a special conference because of the coronavirus outbreak.

Starmer, who was Labour's Brexit spokesman, called his election "the honour and privilege" of his life and vowed to "engage constructively" with Johnson's Conservative government.

Johnson immediately offered his congratulations and the pair spoke, with Starmer accepting an invitation to a government briefing on COVID-19 next week.

"Keir offered to work constructively with the government on how best to respond to the coronavirus outbreak," his spokesman said.

Starmer himself vowed to reunite Labour, after deep rifts between supporters of socialist Corbyn's hard-left ideals and centrists, and wrangling over its Brexit strategy.

He immediately addressed the issue of anti-Semitism that Corbyn was accused of failing to tackle, which tarnished the party's reputation and caused Jewish members to leave in droves.

"Anti-Semitism has been a stain on our party. I have seen the grief that it's brought to so many Jewish communities," Starmer said.

"On behalf of the Labour Party, I am sorry.

"And I will tear out this poison by its roots and judge success by the return of Jewish members and those who felt that they could no longer support us."

Starmer, who won a resounding 56.2 percent of the vote of Labour members, acknowledged the party had "a mountain to climb", after four straight general election defeats -- two under Corbyn.

But he vowed: "We will climb it."

- 'Bad blood and mistrust' -

Labour grew out of the trade union movement but moved to the political centre under former prime minister Tony Blair, who was in office between 1997 and 2007.

Corbyn spent a lifetime on the sidelines because of his left-wing views, and his election as leader in 2015, on the back of a huge surge in party membership, was a shock.

MPs and party members have been locked in an ideological battle ever since.

"There's really a lot of bad blood and mistrust," said Steven Fielding, a political expert at the University of Nottingham.

"The first challenge (for the new leader) will be to put a team together that at least looks like it has the ability to unify the party."

Winning back voters who defected to the Conservatives is also top of Starmer's "to do" list if Labour is to have any hope of victory at the next election, currently scheduled for 2024.

Starmer was opposed to Brexit and supports a second referendum on leaving the European Union.

 

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