• Saturday, November 01, 2014

Scientists 'edit' DNA to cure diseases

Independent.co.uk

A genetic disease has been cured in living, adult animals for the first time using a revolutionary genome-editing technique that can make the smallest changes to the vast database of the DNA molecule with pinpoint accuracy.
Scientists have used the genome-editing technology to cure adult laboratory mice of an inherited liver disease by correcting a single “letter” of the genetic alphabet which had been mutated in a vital gene involved in liver metabolism.
A similar mutation in the same gene causes the equivalent inherited liver disease in humans – and the successful repair of the genetic defect in laboratory mice raises hopes that the first clinical trials on patients could begin within a few years, scientists said.
The success is the latest achievement in the field of genome editing. This has been transformed by the discovery of Crispr, a technology that allows scientists to make almost any DNA changes at precisely defined points on the chromosomes of animals or plants.
"We basically showed you could use the Crispr system in an animal to cure a genetic disease, and the one we picked was a disease in the liver which is very similar to one found in humans," said Prof Daniel Anderson of MIT, who led the study.
Jennifer Doudna, of the University of California, Berkeley, who was one of the co-discoverers of the Crispr technique, said Prof Anderson's study is a “fantastic advance” because it demonstrates that it is possible to cure adult animals living with a genetic disorder.

 

Published: 12:00 am Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Last modified: 10:46 pm Wednesday, April 23, 2014

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