Visual Poetry On Water | The Daily Star
12:00 AM, December 29, 2012 / LAST MODIFIED: 12:00 AM, December 29, 2012

Visual Poetry On Water

Group exhibition at Bengal Gallery

Share this with

Copy this link


L-R: In Search of Water by Qayyum Chowdhury. Water Child by Nazlee Laila Mansur. Thirst by Rafiqun Nabi.

Bengal Gallery and British American Tobacco Bangladesh are holding a painting exhibition highlighting the importance of water. The four daylong show features works of master painters of Bangladesh, including Qayyum Chowdhury, Hashem Khan, Rafiqun Nabi and Mahmudul Haque. Other artists whose paintings are on display at Bengal Gallery in Dhanmondi, Dhaka are: Nazlee Laila Mansur, Farida Zaman, Ranjit Das. Mohammad Eunus, Rokeya Sultana, Kanak Chanpa Chakma, Maksuda Iqbal Nipa and Bishwajit Goswami. Guest artists are: Tahera Khanam and Abul Mansur.
The artists have depicted real images of water scarcity and the excess of water both wreaking havoc. Dedication and hard work went into all the entrees. Careful curating work was done by Ria who usually helps the director of Bengal Gallery, Subir Chowdury.
It has been reported that a calendar of prints with twelve of the paintings will go for a selection in 2013.The paintings were done in an art camp by the well-known artists. This exhibition keeps in mind the environment of Bangladesh and the world over. This effort is known as “Probaho”, by British American Tobacco Bangladesh (BATB). Aside from drinking, water is needed for fisheries, livestock and navigation of boats and vessels. Thus wells, ponds and rivers form the inspiring songs of the monsoon months in Bangladesh.
Qayyum Chowdhury's “In Search of Water” with the grey and black crows flying and searching for water under the burning sun and a dry sky is done in acrylic on canvas. His “Praying for Water” with the billowing ultramarine blue and dashes of rainwater for the parched farmers and fishermen is eye-catching too.
Hashem Khan's acrylic on canvas work, “Water, Life and…”, depicts a damsel in blue sari bearing the traditional beige earthen pitcher, with pale blue squiggles and sweeps at the back. His “Thirsty Crow”, acrylic on canvas, shows a crow, with its sharp beak, sitting on an empty brown water vessel; the forest at the back is done by economic lines of blue, beige, black and white masterful strokes.
“Rain” and “Thirst for Life” by Mahmudul Haque get their inspiration from nature, as do almost all his works. Turquoise, vermilion, dark blue, sunflower yellow and white form the water streams and falling rain in Mahmudul Haque's creations.
From Chittagong come the symbolic and post-modern works of Nazlee Laila Mansur, which bring Munch's “Scream” to mind. Powerful and exotic, dancing with layers of carefully applied colours, the acrylic on canvas works bring women in peril, with tears in their eyes and dying babies -- with dead bird, cow and fish arranged around the “Water Child”. Parched earth with cracks and emerald water in the forefront have been done remarkably.
“Enchanting Waters” I and II, by Farida Zaman, feature blue and red splashes, along with black and white lines, dots and dashes to mark the cascading creations of a thinking female artist, who is overwhelmed by subdued colours and minimalism.
Bengal Gallery also flaunts the works of Ranjit Das, who is said to have the biggest sale in the art market, apart from Kanak Chanpa who reportedly sold her paintings even before they have been displayed at the gallery. The two prolific painters have done works titled “Struggle”, “By the Waters” that have birds along with delightful female forms and balancing water vessels on the head.
The formidable Rokeya Sultana, having returned from her studies in the US, brings in sweeps of blue and gold of the Bangladeshi poets like Michael Madhusudan Dutt and Jasimuddin. Her work is both dynamic and delicate. Rokeya has won many accolades from the US and France. Both she and her husband Rumi exhibit their works and help each other with their exhibition of paintings.
Maksuda Iqbal Nipa and Bishwajit Goswami have soothing blue water waves, along with flying red-billed and green winged ducks. Tahera Khanam and Abul Mansur have birds, butterflies, fish, trees and lyrical elements in their works.
The exhibition ends today.

Stay updated on the go with The Daily Star News App. Click here to download it for your device.

Grameenphone and Robi:
Type START <space> BR and send SMS it to 2222

Banglalink:
Type START <space> BR and send SMS it to 2225

Leave your comments

Top News

Share this with

Copy this link

Top News

Top