Simple rules to keep bird flu at bay | The Daily Star
12:00 AM, February 13, 2008 / LAST MODIFIED: 12:00 AM, February 13, 2008

Editorial

Simple rules to keep bird flu at bay

Need for vigorous awareness campaign compelling

Share this with

Copy this link

The bottomline about containing the spread of bird-flu is three-fold. One, we handle the affected poultry with gloves and masks; two, we dispose of the feathers, skin and droppings of fowls and their innards by dumping them five feet below the surface; and three, ensure cleanliness of the poultry markets.
All three rules are easily complied with provided the messages sink in the minds of the people involved in the poultry business. Their business has already taken a tumble because of the consumer taking fright from the outbreak of avian flu in 37 districts out of 64 we have. To be able to survive the onslaught, the poultry farms and markets including wholesalers and retailers must, in their own interest, take the precautionary measures spelled out above.
The DCC in a latest move has asked the poultry markets in the city to radically improve their sanitary conditions. We have two things to say about it: first, the directive is for 27 Dhaka City Corporation poultry markets, but, to our knowledge, there are 300 other poultry markets requiring to be kept equally clean. Secondly, indiscriminate dressing of the chicken in and out of market premises should be prohibited, at least the operators made to dump the wastes underground. They must all be told to wear masks and gloves.
Awareness need to be enhanced about proper disposal of chicken wastes having regard to the particular fact that animal and bird wastes are often collected by those who are involved in pisciculture and used as fish-feed.
The consumers need to take a number of precautions themselves. They have to cook the fowl at 70 degree centigrade and above, avoid half-cooked and half-boiled meat and eggs. Every household with chicken on its menu must clean up all wastes and have a pit to dump feather, skin and entrails for safety.
There has been no report of human affliction as yet; but we must put adequate treatment facilities in place at the hospitals so that we are prepared for any eventuality.

Leave your comments

Top News

Share this with

Copy this link

Top News

Top