Today's Gallery (2017.06.16) | The Daily Star

Today's Gallery (2017.06.16)

Footpath occupy

Vendors occupy a large portion of a footpath and the road in the capital's Gulistan area. As a result, pedestrians are being forced to walk on the busy road. Despite numerous drives by the authorities concerned to free the footpaths in the area from the hawkers during office hours, they are back in business with the Eid approaching. The photo was taken yesterday around 1:00pm. Photo: Amran Hossain

Water-logging...

The area is experiencing waterlogging following persistent heavy showers over the last few days. A submerged room where a woman chops vegetables sitting on a bed elevated on bricks. Photo: Amran Hossain

Water-logging...

Soaked in knee-deep filthy water, a woman is lucky enough to find a rickshaw right at the doorway of her house. Photo: Amran Hossain

Water-logging...

A man scoops out water over a makeshift brick barrier set at the threshold of his room alongside a road in Poshchim Para area of Sheikhdi under Demra in the capital. Photo: Amran Hossain

Youngest resident...

Say hello to the youngest resident at Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Safari Park, Gazipur. The calf, enjoying the company of her mother in the picture, was born on Tuesday morning. This is the first time a giraffe has been born in a safari park in the country. The number of giraffes including the newborn at the park now stands at nine -- three of them females and five males. The park's Wildlife Inspector Anisur Rahman told our Gazipur correspondent that the immune system of a newborn giraffe is usually vulnerable to human-borne diseases. That is why they would wait for up to two weeks before going in close contact with it to ascertain its gender. They would also announce the name of the baby at a later time. Photo: Collected

Embarrassing...

An embarrassed man and a woman look at a bede woman (gypsy) helplessly as the latter holds the man by his shirt and demands money. Most of the members of the bede community now extort pedestrians or people waiting in traffic on city streets. Snake charming, their primary profession, is now on the decline with the advent of modern entertainment. They also used to make a living by selling various items including glass bangles and charms and providing unconventional healing services. The photo was taken from New Market area in the capital on Wednesday. Photo: Rashed Shumon

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