• Wednesday, September 03, 2014

ICC defends ACSU work

Afp, Aberdeen

The International Cricket Council (ICC) has defended the work of its anti-corruption and security unit, despite announcing a review into how the sport cracks down on fixing.
A report in Britain's Daily Telegraph on Tuesday said the ACSU, which does not have the powers of a law-enforcement agency, would be the first "victim" of the restructuring of the ICC following a shake-up of the global governing body led by the 'big three' nations of India, Australia and England.
During its 14 years in existence, the ACSU -- reported to cost $5.5 million dollars (£3.25 million) per year to run -- has not been directly responsible for uncovering a major case of corruption at a time when cricket has been trying to combat the threat to its integrity posed by match and spot-fixing.
Now there are suggestions the unit, which is headed by former senior British police officer Ronnie Flanagan and employs seven regional around the world, as well as staff in the United Arab Emirates, will be replaced by investigation boards in individual countries as these are better able to liaise with national police forces.
However, ICC chief executive David Richards said Friday: "The suggestion that the ACSU might be failing in its duty to protect the game is entirely misplaced and inaccurate.
"It is important to emphasis that the review is only commencing, and, therefore, to draw any conclusions on the outcome of the review will be premature and detrimental to the working of such an important unit.


Published: 12:00 am Saturday, May 10, 2014

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