• Monday, September 22, 2014

Broad slates umpires

Sports Reporter from Chittagong
England opener Michael Lumb follows through on a copybook off-drive on way to hammering a 24–ball 33 during his side's World Twenty20 match against New Zealand at the Zohur Ahmed Chowdhury Stadium in Chittagong yesterday. PHOTO: ANURUP KANTI DAS
England opener Michael Lumb follows through on a copybook off-drive on way to hammering a 24–ball 33 during his side's World Twenty20 match against New Zealand at the Zohur Ahmed Chowdhury Stadium in Chittagong yesterday. PHOTO: ANURUP KANTI DAS

England captain Stuart Broad criticised the umpires for not suspending their game against New Zealand before the fifth over yesterday. ICC rules state that the result of a game cannot be decided via Duckworth-Lewis, until five overs are played. Yesterday, the match was called off after 5.2 overs, when it started raining.
Broad however, felt that the umpires should have called off the game at the start of the fourth over, by which time the stadium had already witnessed lightning strikes.
“To be as polite as I possibly can be. It was distinctly average decision making to keep us throughout after the first thunder light. I think both sides were uncomfortable out there,
“After the first five overs both sides were very similar. We can feel a little bit aggrieved to have that as a loss against our name. They (umpires) didn't feel like it was a threat. I can guarantee from our side that it was. I wouldn't be putting the crowd and players safety in threat,” said Broad, adding that he had talked to Brendan McCullum regarding the matter on the field.
New Zealand's Kyle Mills however, did not share the same opinion.
 “I think it's probably a bit of hindsight thing isn't it, if Stuart was on the other end of it he would have been more than happy with the decision. It just so happens that we got another over in the game,” said Mills.
At the end of four overs the Kiwis were poised at 31 for 1 and needed ten more runs at the end of five to win the game. McCullum, who knew the equations by then, hit three boundaries to take them home.

Published: 12:00 am Sunday, March 23, 2014

Last modified: 12:56 am Sunday, March 23, 2014

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